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Immaturity of Maturity Models (James Bach’s Blog)

On May 16, 2011, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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Maturities models (TMMi, CMM, CMMi, etc.) are a dumb idea. They are evidence of immaturity in our craft. Insecure managers sometimes cling to them as they might a treasured baby blanket. In so doing, they retard their own growth and learning.

A client of mine recently asked for some arguments against the concept of maturity models in testing. My reply makes for a nice post, so here goes…

First, here are two articles attacking the general idea of “maturity” models:

Maturity Models Have it Backwards

The Immaturity of the CMM

Here is another article that attacks one of the central tenets of most maturity models, which is the idea that there are universal “best practices”:

No Best Practices

And of course commercial tester certification, which I often ridicule on this blog, is a related phenomenon.
Here are some talking points:

1. I suggest this definition of maturity: “Maturity is the degree to which a system has realized its potential and adapted to its context.”

In support of this definition, consider these relevant snippets from the Oxford English Dictionary.

* Fullness or perfection of growth or development.
* Deliberateness of action; mature consideration, due deliberation.
* The state of being complete, perfect, or ready; fullness of development.
* The stage at which substantial growth no longer occurs.

2. I suggest this definition of maturity model: “a maturity model is plan for achieving maturity.”

By this definition, I know of nothing that is called a “maturity model” that actually is a maturity model. This is because maturity cannot be achieved by mimicking the “look” of mature organizations. Maturity is achieved through growing and learning as you encounter and deal with natural problems.

3. Maturity is not our goal in engineering. Our goal is to achieve success, satisfaction, security, and respect through the mechanism of doing good work.

No one gains success through maturity. It is not our goal. Some businesses benefit by the appearance of maturity, but that is a matter of marketing, not engineering. And regardless of how we achieve maturity, not all maturity is desirable. A creature approaching death is also mature.

Hey, blacksmithing is a mature craft, and yet look around… where are the blacksmiths? The world has moved on. We are in a period of growth, study, and creativity in testing. No one can say what the state of the art of our craft will be in 50 years. It will evolve, and we– our minds and experiences– are the engine of that evolution.

4. The behaviors of a healthy mature organization cannot be a template for success.

We achieve maturity by learning and growing as a testing organization, not by aiming at or emulating “mature” behaviors.

Maturity is a dependent variable. We don’t manipulate our maturity directly. We simply learn and grow, wherever that takes us. As any parent knows, you cannot speed up the maturation of your children by entreating them to “be mature.” Their very immaturity is partly the means by which they will mature. Immature creatures play and experiment. Research in rats, for instance, documents severe developmental problems in rats that were prevented from playing. Rats who don’t play as juveniles are much less able to deal with unexpected situations as adults. They cannot deal effectively with stress, compared to normal rats.

There can NEVER be one ultimate form or process that we declare to be mature, UNLESS our context never changes. This is because, in engineering, we are in the business of solving problems in context. However, our context changes regularly, because people change, technology changes, and because we are continuing to experiment and innovate.

Darwin’s theory of the origin of species is also a theory of the maturation and continual re-generation of species. As he understood, maturity is always a relative matter.

5. The “maturity model” of any outsider is essentially a propaganda tool. It is a marketing tool, not an engineering tool.

Every attempt to formalize testing constitutes a claim, on some person’s part, that he knows what testing should be, and that other people cannot be trusted to know this (otherwise, why not let them decide for themselves how to test?).

I have formalized testing, myself, and that’s exactly what I am thinking when I do so. But I do not impose my view of testing on any other organization or tester, unless they work for me. My formalizations are specific to my experiences and analysis of specific situations. I offer these ideas to my clients as input to a process of ongoing study and adaptation. To make any best practice claims would be irresponsible.

6. If you want to get better try this: create an environment where learning and innovation is encouraged; institutionalize mechanisms that promote this, such as internal training, peer conferences, pilot projects, and mentoring.

As my colleague Michael Bolton likes to say “no mature person, involved in a serious matter, lets any other mature person do their thinking for them.”

Mature people take responsibility for themselves. Therefore, don’t adopt anyone else’s “maturity model” of testing. Let your own people lead you.

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