Blog

Variable Testers (James Bach’s Blog)

On April 13, 2014, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
0

I once heard a vice president of software engineering tell his people that they needed to formalize their work. That day, I was an unpaid consultant in the building to give a free seminar, so I had even less restraint than normal about arguing with the guy. I raised my hand, “I don’t think you can mean that, sir. Formality is about sameness. Are you really concerned that your people are working in different ways? It seems to me that what you ought to be concerned about is effectiveness. In other words, get the job done. If the work is done a different way every time, but each time done well, would you really have a problem with that? For that matter, do you actually know how your folks work?”

This was years ago. I’m wracking my brain, but I can’t remember specifically how the executive responded. All I remember is that he didn’t reply with anything very specific and did not seem pleased to be corrected by some stranger who came to give a talk.

Oh well, it had to be done.

I have occasionally heard the concern by managers that testers are variable in their work; that some testers are better than others; and that this variability is a problem. But variability is not a problem in and of itself. When you drive a car, there are different cars on the road each day, and you have to make different patterns of turning the wheel and pushing the brake. So what?

The weird thing is how utterly obvious this is. Think about managers, designers, programmers, product owners… think about ANYONE in engineering. We are all variable. Complaining about testers being variable– as if that were a special case– seems bizarre to me… unless…

I suppose there are two things that come to mind which might explain it:

1) Maybe they mean “testers vary between satisfying me and not satisfying me, unlike other people, who always satisfy me.” To examine this we would discover what their expectations are. Maybe they are reasonable or maybe they are not. Maybe a better system for training and leading testers is needed.

2) Maybe they mean “testing is a strictly formal process that by its nature should not vary.” This is a typical belief by people who know nothing about testing. What they need is to have testing explained or demonstrated to them by someone who knows what he’s doing.

 

 

 

 

 

Tagged with:
 

Comments are closed.


Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:


Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!