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How Not to Standardize Testing (ISO 29119) (James Bach’s Blog)

On August 25, 2014, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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Many years ago I took a management class. One of the exercises we did was on achieving consensus. My group did not reach an agreement because I wouldn’t lower my standards. I wanted to discuss the matter further, but the other guys grew tired of arguing with me and declared “consensus” over my objections. This befuddled me, at first. The whole point of the exercise was to reach a common decision, and we had failed, by definition, to do that– so why declare consensus at all? It’s like getting checkmated in chess and then declaring that, well, you still won the part of the game that you cared about… the part before the checkmate.

Later I realized this is not so bizarre. What they had effectively done is ostracize me from the team. They had changed the players in the game. The remaining team did come to consensus. In the years since, I have found that changing the boundaries or membership of a community is indeed an important pillar of consensus building. I have used this tactic many times to avoid unhelpful debate. It is one reason why I say that I’m a member of the Context-Driven School of Testing. My school does not represent all schools, and the other schools do not represent mine. Therefore, we don’t need consensus with them.

Then what about ISO 29119?

The ISO organization claims to have a new standard for software testing. But ISO 29119 is not a standard for testing. It cannot be a standard for testing.

A standard for testing would have to reflect the values and practices of the world community of testers. Yet, the concerns of the Context-Driven School of thought, which has been in development for at least 15 years have been ignored and our values shredded by this so-called standard and the process used to create it. They have done this by excluding us. There are two organizations explicitly devoted to Context-Driven values (AST and ISST) and our community holds several major conferences a year. Members of our community speak at all the major practitioners conferences, and our ideas are widely cited. Some of the most famous testers in the the world, including me, are Context-Driven testers. We exist, and together with the Agilists, we are the source of nearly every new idea in testing in the last decade.

The reason they have excluded us is that they know we won’t agree to any simplistic standard based on templates or simple formulae. We know those things look pretty but they don’t help. If ISO doesn’t exclude us, they worry they will never finish. They know we will challenge their evidence, and even their ethics and basic competence. This is why I say the craft is not ready for standards. It will be years before all the recognized experts in testing can come together and agree on anything substantial.

The people running the ISO effort know exactly who we are. I personally have had multiple public debates with Stuart Reid, on stage. He cannot pretend we don’t exist. He cannot pretend we are some sort of lunatic fringe. Tens of thousands of testers have watched my video lectures or bought my books. This is not a case where ISO can simply declare us to be outsiders.

The Burden of Proof

The Context-Driven community stands for excellence in testing. This is why we must reject this depraved attempt by ISO to grab power and assert control over our craft. Our craft is still an open marketplace of ideas, and it is full of strong debates. We must protect that marketplace and allow it to evolve. I want the fair chance to put my competitors out of business (or get them to change their business) with the high quality of my work. Context-Driven testing has been growing in strength and numbers over the years. Whereas this ISO effort appears to be a job protection program for people who can’t stomach debate. They can’t win the debate so they want to remake the rules.

The burden of proof is not on me or any of us to show that the standard is wrong, nor is it our job to make it right. The burden is on those who claim that the craft can be standardized to study the craft and recognize and resolve the deep differences among us. Failing that, there can be no ethical or rational basis for standardization.

This blog post puts me on record as opposing the ISO 29119 standard. Together with my colleagues, we constitute a determined and sustained and principled opposition.

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