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The New Testing Conference (James Bach’s Blog)

On February 21, 2016, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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Anna Royzman is starting a new testing conference which she has decided to call the New Testing Conference. Anna has asked me to tell you about some of the ways we will be trying to live up to that bold name.

(Disclosure: although it doesn’t belong to me and I am not in charge of anything, bear in mind that I have an economic interest in it. I’m being paid to present at it and I’m advising Anna on the design of the program and invitation of speakers. I will be doing a tutorial and probably other things, too.)

Position Talks as Gentle Debate

We were talking about what it means to have a test conference that focuses on “newness” and one of the things we realized is that new is always controversial. New is always sketchy. For any new practice, there will be lots of practitioners who roll their eyes about it or scowl darkly. Therefore, if we want to talk about new things, we have to deal with the clash between “tried and comfortable” and “new and nervous.” So, this conference must help good ideas move beyond the new and nervous stage, while letting the not so good ideas fall back into obscurity (at least for a while… until the next generation unearths it again like a cursed monkey paw).

A structure we want to try is this:

  1. Hold two or more short position talks around a particular topic. For instance “Is BDD worth doing or a vain waste of time?”
  2. The speakers discuss and debate the topic BEFORE the conference. That way, at the conference, they would be able to put their best ideas forward and avoid misrepresenting the other side’s argument.
  3. They each speak for 10-15 minutes explaining their arguments.
  4. There is a 20-minute break for the audience, during which they may speak with the speakers to give them ideas or continue the debate. The speaker don’t get a break.
  5. The speakers give 5-minute follow-up lightning talks to respond to the other speakers or amend their previous statements.

Each Track Talk Includes a Demonstration, Exercise, or Experience Report

We feel that just talking about concepts isn’t enough. So, each track talk will include at least one of the following:

  • Demonstration: Show how an idea works in practice, then take questions and comments from the audience.
  • Exercise: Get the audience to try something, then debrief.
  • Experience Report: Tell a specific story about something that you experienced at a particular time and place, then take questions and comments.

“360 degree” Tutorials

I’m not sure if that’s quite the right name, but we want to do some workshops based on a particular structure I’ve been experimenting with:

  1. The instructor offers a challenge (which he has previously performed and has results ready to share).
  2. The students perform the challenge.
  3. Debrief with instructor commentary and critique.
  4. The instructor shows what he did and challenges the students to critique it.
  5. Students critique instructors work.
  6. Instructor critiques his own work.

Part of the fun of a “360” kind of workshop, as an instructor, is that I try to anticipate every criticism that the students will make of my work. I usually miss something, but then I add it to my list of critiques and I am even more prepared for the next time I run the workshop. I end up looking smarter and smarter– but of course the punchline is: I’m smarter because I opened myself to all this criticism. And when we all get comfortable hearing critical reactions to our work, our whole community grows smarter, faster.

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