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In 1983, my boss, Dale Disharoon, designed a little game called Alphabet Zoo. My job was to write the Commodore 64 and Apple II versions of that game. Alphabet Zoo is a game for kids who are learning to read. The child uses a joystick to move a little character through a maze, collecting letters to spell words.

We did no user testing on this game until the very day we sent the final software to the publisher. On that day, we discovered that out target users (five year-olds) did not have the ability to use a joystick well enough to play the game. They just got frustrated and gave up.

We shipped anyway.

This game became a bestseller.

alphabet-zoo

It was placed on a list of educational games recommended by the National Education Association.

alphabet-zoo-list

Source: Information Please Almanac, 1986

So, how to explain this?

Some years later, when I became a father, I understood. My son was able to play a lot of games that were too hard for him because I operated the controls. I spoke to at least one dad who did exactly that with Alphabet Zoo.

I guess the moral of the story is: we don’t necessarily know the value of our own creations.

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