How Michael Bolton and I Collaborate on Articles (James Bach’s Blog)

On September 5, 2016, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing

(Someone posted a question on Quora asking how Michael and I write articles together. This is the answer I gave, there.)

It begins with time. We take our time. We rarely write on a deadline, except for fun, self-imposed deadlines that we can change if we really want to. For Michael and I, the quality of our writing always dominates over any other consideration.

Next is our commitment to each other. Neither one of us can contemplate releasing an article that the other of us is not proud of and happy with. Each of us gets to “stop ship” at any time, for any reason. We develop a lot of our work through debate, and sometimes the debate gets heated. I have had many colleagues over the years who tired of my need to debate even small issues. Michael understands that. When our debating gets too hot, as it occasionally does, we know how to stop, take a break if necessary, and remember our friendship.

Then comes passion for the subject. We don’t even try to write articles about things we don’t care about. Otherwise, we couldn’t summon the energy for the debate and the study that we put into our work. Michael and I are not journalists. We don’t function like reporters talking about what other people do. You will rarely find us quoting other people in our work. We speak from our own experiences, which gives us a sort of confidence and authority that comes through in our writing.

Our review process also helps a lot. Most of the work we do is reviewed by other colleagues. For our articles, we use more reviewers. The reviewers sometimes give us annoying responses, and they generally aren’t as committed to debating as we are. But we listen to each one and do what we can to answer their concerns without sacrificing our own vision. The responses can be annoying when a reviewer reads something into our article that we didn’t put there; some assumption that may make sense according to someone else’s methodology but not for our way of thinking. But after taking some time to cool off, we usually add more to the article to build a better bridge to the reader. This is especially true when more than one reviewer has a similar concern. Ultimately, of course, pleasing people is not our mission. Our mission is to say something true, useful, important, and compassionate (in that order of priority, at least in my case). Note that “amiable” and “easy to understand” or “popular” are not on that short list of highest priorities.

As far as the mechanisms of collaboration go, it depends on who “owns” it. There are three categories of written work: my blog, Michael’s blog, and jointly authored standalone articles. For the latter, we use Google Docs until we have a good first draft. Sometimes we write simultaneously on the same paragraph; more normally we work on different parts of it. If one of us is working on it alone he might decide to re-architect the whole thing, subject, of course, to the approval of the other.

After the first full draft (our recent automation article went through 28 revisions, according to Google Docs, over 14-weeks, before we reached that point), one of us will put it into Word and format it. At some point one of us will become the “article boss” and manage most of the actual editing to get it done, while the other one reviews each draft and comments. One heuristic of reviewing we frequently use is to turn change-tracking off for the first re-read, if there have been many changes.  That way whichever of us is reviewing is less likely to object to a change based purely on attachment to the previous text, rather than having an actual problem with the new text.

For the blogs, usually we have a conversation, then the guy whose going to publish it on his blog writes a draft and does all the editing while getting comments from the other guy. The publishing party decides when to “ship” but will not do so over the other party’s objections.

I hope that makes it reasonably clear.

(Thanks to Michael Bolton for his review.)

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