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Rethinking Equivalence Class Partitioning, Part 1 (James Bach’s Blog)

On November 27, 2016, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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Wikipedia’s article on equivalence class partitioning (ECP) is a great example of the poor thinking and teaching and writing that often passes for wisdom in the testing field. It’s narrow and misleading, serving to imply that testing is some little game we play with our software, rather than an open investigation of a complex phenomenon.

(No, I’m not going to edit that article. I don’t find it fun or rewarding to offer my expertise in return for arguments with anonymous amateurs. Wikipedia is important because it serves as a nearly universal reference point when criticizing popular knowledge, but just like popular knowledge itself, it is not fixable. The populus will always prevail, and the populus is not very thoughtful.)

In this article I will comment on the Wikipedia post. In a subsequent post I will describe ECP my way, and you can decide for yourself if that is better than Wikipedia.

“Equivalence partitioning or equivalence class partitioning (ECP)[1] is a software testing technique that divides the input data of a software unit into partitions of equivalent data from which test cases can be derived.”

Not exactly. There’s no reason why ECP should be limited to “input data” as such. The ECP thought process may be applied to output, or even versions of products, test environments, or test cases themselves. ECP applies to anything you might be considering to do that involves any variations that may influence the outcome of a test.

Yes, ECP is a technique, but a better word for it is “heuristic.” A heuristic is a fallible method of solving a problem. ECP is extremely fallible, and yet useful.

“In principle, test cases are designed to cover each partition at least once. This technique tries to define test cases that uncover classes of errors, thereby reducing the total number of test cases that must be developed.”

This text is pretty good. Note the phrase “In principle” and the use of the word “tries.” These are softening words, which are important because ECP is a heuristic, not an algorithm.

Speaking in terms of “test cases that must be developed,” however, is a misleading way to discuss testing. Testing is not about creating test cases. It is for damn sure not about the number of test cases you create. Testing is about performing experiments. And the totality of experimentation goes far beyond such questions as “what test case should I develop next?” The text should instead say “reducing test effort.”

“An advantage of this approach is reduction in the time required for testing a software due to lesser number of test cases.”

Sorry, no. The advantage of ECP is not in reducing the number of test cases. Nor is it even about reducing test effort, as such (even though it is true that ECP is “trying” to reduce test effort). ECP is just a way to systematically guess where the bigger bugs probably are, which helps you focus your efforts. ECP is a prioritization technique. It also helps you explain and defend those choices. Better prioritization does not, by itself, allow you to test with less effort, but we do want to stumble into the big bugs sooner rather than later. And we want to stumble into them with more purpose and less stumbling. And if we do that well, we will feel comfortable spending less effort on the testing. Reducing effort is really a side effect of ECP.

“Equivalence partitioning is typically applied to the inputs of a tested component, but may be applied to the outputs in rare cases. The equivalence partitions are usually derived from the requirements specification for input attributes that influence the processing of the test object.”

Typically? Usually? Has this writer done any sort of research that would substantiate that? No.

ECP is a process that we all do informally, not only in testing but in our daily lives. When you push open a door, do you consciously decide to push on a specific square centimeter of the metal push plate? No, you don’t. You know that for most doors it doesn’t matter where you push. All pushable places are more or less equivalent. That is ECP! We apply ECP to anything that we interact with.

Yes, we apply it to output. And yes, we can think of equivalence classes based on specifications, but we also think of them based on all other learning we do about the software. We perform ECP based on all that we know. If what we know is wrong (for instance if there are unexpected bugs) then our equivalence classes will also be wrong. But that’s okay, if you understand that ECP is a heuristic and not a golden ticket to perfect testing.

“The fundamental concept of ECP comes from equivalence class which in turn comes from equivalence relation. A software system is in effect a computable function implemented as an algorithm in some implementation programming language. Given an input test vector some instructions of that algorithm get covered, ( see code coverage for details ) others do not…”

At this point the article becomes Computer Science propaganda. This is why we can’t have nice things in testing: as soon as the CS people get hold of it, they turn it into a little logic game for gifted kids, rather than a pursuit worthy of adults charged with discovering important problems in technology before it’s too late.

The fundamental concept of ECP has nothing to do with computer science or computability. It has to do with logic. Logic predates computers. An equivalence class is simply a set. It is a set of things that share some property. The property of interest in ECP is utility for exploring a particular product risk. In other words, an equivalence class in testing is an assertion that any member of that particular group of things would be more or less equally able to reveal a particular kind of bug if it were employed in a particular kind of test.

If I define a “test condition” as something about a product or its environment that could be examined in a test, then I can define equivalence classes like this: An equivalence class is a set of tests or test conditions that are equivalent with respect to a particular product risk, in a particular context. 

This implies that two inputs which are not equivalent for the purposes of one kind of bug may be equivalent for finding another kind of bug. It also implies that if we model a product incorrectly, we will also be unable to know the true equivalence classes. Actually, considering that bugs come in all shapes and sizes, to have the perfectly correct set of equivalence classes would be the same as knowing, without having tested, where all the bugs in the product are. This is because ECP is based on guessing what kind of bugs are in the product.

If you read the technical stuff about Computer Science in the Wikipedia article, you will see that the author has decided that two inputs which cover the same code are therefore equivalent for bug finding purposes. But this is not remotely true! This is a fantasy propagated by people who I suspect have never tested anything that mattered. Off the top of my head, code-coverage-as-gold-standard ignores performance bugs, requirements bugs, usability bugs, data type bugs, security bugs, and integration bugs. Imagine two tests that cover the same code, and both involve input that is displayed on the screen, except that one includes an input which is so long that when it prints it goes off the edge of the screen. This is a bug that the short input didn’t find, even though both inputs are “valid” and “do the same thing” functionally.

The Fundamental Problem With Most Testing Advice Is…

The problem with most testing advice is that it is either uncritical folklore that falls apart as soon as you examine it, or else it is misplaced formalism that doesn’t apply to realistic open-ended problems. Testing advice is better when it is grounded in a general systems perspective as well as a social science perspective. Both of these perspectives understand and use heuristics. ECP is a powerful, ubiquitous, and rather simple heuristic, whose utility comes from and is limited by your mental model of the product. In my next post, I will walk through an example of how I use it in real life.

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