Syndicated

Speak Easy program (zagorski software tester)

On May 27, 2017, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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Reading Time: 2 minutesTL;DR This post is about my journey start with speak easy program. During the CAST 2016 in Vancouver, I heard about speak easy program. That program helps you to compose your talk proposal for testing conference. It is voluntary based and created by Anne-Marie Charrett and Fiona Charles. I applied in August last year. On … Continue reading Speak Easy program

18 GitHub Projects for Testing (Chris Kenst's Blog)

On May 26, 2017, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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Aside from it’s many awesome lists GitHub is a really good place for open source testing tools, libraries and frameworks (and their corresponding code). I’m pleasantly surprised by these new (and sometimes old) testing resources, so I’d like to highlight many of them in the hopes others might also find them useful. The challenge with […]

Spread the Word: 30 Days of Accessibility Testing (TESTHEAD)

On May 26, 2017, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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The Ministry of Testing has declared that May should be “30 Days of Accessibility Testing”. As in the days of yore when I used to take on these challenges and blog regularly, I’m in the mood to get back to doing that. Therefore, I am looking to write a…

Shapes of Things: 30 Days of Accessibility Testing (TESTHEAD)

On May 25, 2017, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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The Ministry of Testing has declared that May should be “30 Days of Accessibility Testing“. As in the days of yore when I used to take on these challenges and blog regularly, I’m in the mood to get back to doing that. Therefore, I am looking to write a post every day around this topic and as a way to address each line of their checklist.

Taking a brief moment in this post to reflect on a milestone. Thank you to everyone who reads TESTHEAD. This morning, my one millionth visitor came to this site. I wish I could figure out who that person is, but regardless, I want to say thank you to everyone who has come here over the years, whether it be one time or repeat reading.

25. Explore W3C’s Before and After Demonstration


The subtitle for this page is “Improving a Web site using Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0”, and I have to say, this is a nice little resource to see because it gives you some concrete examples of what you could/should do to make a site accessible.
Here are two pictures of the home page they use for their example (there are several pages with before/after examples). 
Before picture of the W3C example site
Here’s the “Before” picture example. Notables are the headings for the pictures and the phone number at the bottom only using a hip word spell out.

After picture of the W3C example site
Here’s the “After” picture example. Other than some cosmetic variations on the layout, notable changes are having more meaningful headers for the image blocks, and the phone number displays both the digital version and the lettered mnemonic.
What’ nice about this example is that you can put the two pages side by side in two separate browser windows and just by looking at the two, you can see why the After picture would be preferable.
If, however, you want to see what can be improved and what was applied in greater depth, each page has annotations to show exactly what needed to be changed and what change was applied. The top nav bar can quickly toggle between Before/After to see what has been changed. 
If you have been curious as to see how cumulative changes can be applied and the rationale behind what they are, then have a look at the Before and After simulation.

שמות עתיקים ומעלי עובשnames that get old and stale (אשרי אדם מפחד תמיד Happy is the man who always fears)

On May 24, 2017, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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אחד הדברים הראשונים שמלמדים בכל קורס מבוא לתכנות הוא שחשוב מאוד לבחור שמות משתנים בעלי משמעות. הם הופכים את הקוד לקריא יותר וחוסכים שעות על גבי שעות של עבודה. 
נקודה קטנה שלא מזכירים מספיק, היא ששמות מתיישנים. לפעמים קורה שהשפה בה אנחנו משתמשים משתנה. למשל – אם יש לנו יכולת לבטל את פעילות המערכת עבור משתמש מסויים, מה הגיוני יותר מאשר לקרוא למשתנה שקובע האם יש למנהל הרשאה להפסיק את החלק המרכזי בשירות בשם PERM_DEACTIVATION ? ואם, נוסף על היכולת הזו, יש לנו יכולת ביטול מלאה של השירות, למה לא לקרוא לזה PERM_FULL_DEACTIVATION? 
והנה, שלוש שנים אחר כך, בכל פעם בה מישהו אומר “הפסקת שירות” צריך לשאול אותו שבע פעמים לאילו משתי הפונקציות הוא מתכוון. 
השבוע יצא לי להתמודד עם סוג נוסף, קצת יותר זדוני, של שם משתנה שהזדקן רע. 
יש לנו במערכת משתמשים. חלקם, מתוקף תפקידם, יכולים ליצור משתמשים אחרים. אחד מהם, במקרה, נקרא “מנהל הכל”. במקור הוא נכתב כשיש לו את ההרשאות ליצור את כל סוגי המשתמשים האפשריים. 
אבל, כמו שקורה במערכות מתפתחות – נוספו עוד סוגי משתמשים. וכמובן, אף אחד לא זכר לעדכן את ההרשאות של סוג המנהל הנ”ל. שמונה שנים (לפחות) מאוחר יותר, בשעת ערב לא מאוד מוקדמת, משבר! לקוחות זועמים! מנהלים מקיימים שיחות עתירות משתתפים! בוקה ומבוקה ומבולקה. 
לא אלאה אתכם בפרטים הקטנים, רק אציין נקודה אחת – חלק מהפתרון לבעיה הצריך יצירה של מנהל מערכת שיכול ליצור את כל סוגי המשתמשים. “אין בעיה”, הכרזתי. יש לנו את “מנהל הכל”, וכל חברי הצוות שהיו מעורבים הביעו הסכמה, למרות שכל אחד מהמשתתפים, לפחות פעם אחת (וכנראה שיותר) בשנים האחרונות, נתקל בפער ההרשאות הזה בין “מנהל הכל” לבין סוגי המשתמשים שיש במערכת. למרות זאת – כולנו היינו בטוחים ש”מנהל הכל” יכול לעשות את מה שאנחנו רוצים. אחרי הכל, למה שיקראו לו ככה אם הוא לא יכול לעשות הכל? כשבדקנו וגילינו שבעצם, לא – הוא לא יכול, נזכרתי שכבר הייתי בדיוק באותה סיטואציה בעבר, וכבר “גיליתי” שהיכולות של המשתמש הזה חסרות, ושככה, עם היכולות האלה,  הוא מוגדר בתיעוד הרשמי שלנו. 
אין לי מסקנה עמוקה במיוחד מכל הסיפור הזה, חוץ מאשר דבר אחד – לשמות יש כוח. השקיעו מאמץ בתחזוקה הולמת שלהם. 
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One of the first things that are being taught at every introductory programming course is “choose meaningful names for your variables”. Those names make your code more readable, and save hours of work. 
A small point that don’t get mentioned enough, is that names deteriorate. Sometimes, the domain language we speak is changing and old terms become meaningless, sometimes, it a matter of duplication – After all, what’s more sensible than naming the permission to deactivate the main flow of our product as “PERM_DEACTIVATE” ? and, if we have another feature enabling full deactivation, why not name it PERM_FULL_DEACTIVATION? Three years later, you’ll find yourselves asking each time “when you say ‘deactivate’, which of the two do you mean?”. 
This week I got to deal with another, nastier form of term deterioration. 
In our systems there are users. As can be expected, where there are users, there are also admins that can manage those users. One of them is called “admin-all”. Originally (we believe) it was meant to create all kinds of users in our system. As sometimes happens in developing systems – more roles were added at a later phase, and no one updated the admin-all permissions (it might even be that it was intentional and not a matter of negligence). Eight years later (at least), a crisis happens! Customers are furious! managers are gathering over phone to discuss! Chaos is reigning!
I won’t bother you with the exact details of the problem, I’ll only mention that we needed to provide someone with an admin that can create all other users. “Well, easy”, I said. “Just give them an ‘admin-all'”. All the other people in the conversation, all of whom have more years of experience with the product than my mere 5 years, voiced their agreement. Yep, that’s the user we need. Each and every one of us have encountered at least once in the past the gap between the claim “admin all” and the actual privileges, so when a short check we did showed that some privileges are missing, all of us had this “oh, right, I forgot” moment. 
I don’t really have deep insights from this story, except, perhaps – make sure to maintain the names you choose, and update them if you have reason to. It saves confusion and mistakes later. 

Cambridge Lean Coffee (Hiccupps)

On May 24, 2017, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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This month’s Lean Coffee was hosted by Redgate. Here’s some brief, aggregated comments and questions  on topics covered by the group I was in.What benefit would pair testing give me?I want to get my team away from scripted test cases and I th…

What is the Law? 30 Days of Accessibility Testing (TESTHEAD)

On May 24, 2017, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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The Ministry of Testing has declared that May should be “30 Days of Accessibility Testing”. As in the days of yore when I used to take on these challenges and blog regularly, I’m in the mood to get back to doing that. Therefore, I am looking to write a…

My Testbash Belfast 2017 Experience Report Part I (Nicky Tests Software)

On May 24, 2017, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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This is a two-part Experience Report, the first part will cover preparing my talk, the pre-Testbash Shindig and the first half of the conference. The second part will cover the second half of the conference and the Post-Testbash shindig.

Preparing my talk

I started preparing my talk around 2-2.5 months before the conference. But I didn’t properly gain momentum until about 1.5 months before my talk. Initially I tried to write the whole talk in Google Docs – but I found that didn’t work for me. Instead, I ended up creating the slides and writing speaker notes below.

I aimed to have a completed presentation ASAP and then just edit it continuously up until I gave my talk. I find it a lot easier to edit a presentation that’s complete than to add more to one that is incomplete.

Pre-Testbash Shindig at Puppet Belfast

It was awesome. I got to meet some people I hadn’t seen in yonks (too many to mention, you know who you are!) and also got to meet some people I hadn’t met in real life before such as Nick Shaw and Ash Coleman. I steered clear of the alcohol as I didn’t want to be hungover for my talk the next morning (yes my tolerance is that low I can’t even handle 2 glasses of wine).

There was also this really cute dog in the office I kept trying to get selfies with – but failed miserably.

First half of the Conference
We kicked things off with a talk by Liz Keogh on Cynefin for Testers. Some key tidbits that stood out to me were her explaining to us that often people think they have certainty when they really don’t. She also explained to us how people may think they are working in one part of the Cynefin model (e.g. the complicated domain) when they are in fact in another part (the complex domain) To illustrate this, she asked us how many people have been asked for estimates when we didn’t know for sure what the estimated time would be – then she asked, how many people found their estimates ended up being a promise.
After, we had Jeremias Rössler talk about Tested by Monkeys – the end of Banana software. I liked his explanation of Traditional Monkey testing: which is easy to implement and finds bugs – but can’t distinguish between bugs that are of interest to the stakeholders and bugs that aren’t/
After the break we had Mark Winteringham  talk about the Automated Testing Paradox.  Below is a visual representation of it: 

Just before my talk, we had Rob Meaney. Unfortunately I only caught 10min of his talk before I went to another room to mentally prepare for mine. I heard from lots of people that it was an amazing talk and I hope I get to see him speak at a conference or meet-up in the future. 

Mental Hopscotch: 30 Days of Accessibility Testing (TESTHEAD)

On May 23, 2017, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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The Ministry of Testing has declared that May should be “30 Days of Accessibility Testing”. As in the days of yore when I used to take on these challenges and blog regularly, I’m in the mood to get back to doing that. Therefore, I am looking to write a…

Software testing is… part 2 – rooted in social science (Mr.Slavchev())

On May 23, 2017, in Syndicated, by Association for Software Testing
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This is the second part of the series software testing is, based on the mind map I provided in the initial post, you can take a look here: http://mrslavchev.com/2016/11/04/software-testing-is-part-1/ I bet that big part of the readers of this blog will be puzzled by the presence of the words software and social science in the same […]

The post Software testing is… part 2 – rooted in social science appeared first on Mr.Slavchev().

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